Doll House Museum

The Doll House Museum in Marysville, Kansas, has closed its doors this month after opening 25 years ago. The museum housed an original collection of Native American dolls and artifacts from the Otoe-Missouria Tribe.

The Doll House Museum in Marysville, Kansas, has closed its doors this month after opening 25 years ago.

Lois Cohorst, museum owner and director, said she opened the museum after purchasing a collection of dolls that were originally for her daughter.

The museum grew to hundreds of well-crafted dolls placed in displays and settings that included a replica of a village. The dolls also were placed in detailed settings that were themed to match their clothing or the era they were created.

The dolls were made by artists from around the world and included dolls made during the Great Depression.

“The dolls made during the depression were not made by those trained artistically but they did a great job,” Cohorst said.

The museum was housed in a pre-1900 brick building that faces the historic brick streets in the town of Marysville.

“I know the history of each doll because I researched them,” Cohorst said. “It was great fun. The most fun I’ve had in my life was building the museum. I collected and found the dolls as I traveled.”

In addition, the museum housed an original collection of Native American dolls and artifacts from the Otoe-Missouria Tribe.

She said most of the collection came from Missouria Tribe member Truman Dailey who gifted to her items such as his tomahawk and his grandmother’s deer-skinned dress. Dailey died at 100 years old and he lived in Red Rock, Oklahoma.

“He gave me the incentive to start collecting and to learn more,” Cohorst said. “He told me fascinating stories. He was originally from the Missouria Tribe.”

The museum also displayed nativity scenes from countries such as Peru, Pakistan, Mexico, Germany and Israel.

The Doll House Museum was located at 912 Broadway in Marysville, Kansas. For more information on the Native American artifacts or dolls, contact Cohorst by phone at 785-713-2226.

Maragret Slayton can be reached at margaret.slayton@newspressnow.com.