fishing

Harrison Fishery has over 120 acres of water and 75 production ponds plus a new state of the art 100,000 gallon indoor re-circulating system.

Harrison Fishery has over 120 acres of water and 75 production ponds plus a new state of the art 100,000 gallon indoor re-circulating system.

The largest fish hatchery in the state of Missouri and one of the largest in the Midwest sits in a valley in the northeast region of the state. Harrison Fishery has over 120 acres of water and 75 production ponds plus a new state of the art 100,000 gallon indoor re-circulating system. The indoor system is where straight and hybrid bluegill, largemouth bass and smallmouth bass are kept until they have food training before being released into the ponds. Curtis Harrison is the owner of the fishery. Harrison graduated from the University of Missouri with an engineering degree. After graduation he returned home and bought a “hobby farm”. “I soon realized that this farm was no hobby, I worked from sun up to sun down and made barely enough money to support myself,” Harrison said. Harrison did some investigation into the idea of a fish hatchery since the farm already had three ponds. “I added another three ponds the first year and then four the next,” Harrison explained. “My father helped me the first three years and then retired, by that time the farm was well on its way and I really enjoy having control over my own destiny.” Today, Harrison’s youngest son Carter is learning the business and the farm has nine fulltime workers. “I treat everyone like family, we work hard but we also laugh hard,” Harrison said. Harrison said his quality and cost of product simply can’t be beat on the local level. “Our customers want a higher quality fish. One of our largest customers is the Missouri Conservation Department. We also have done work for Bass Pro Shops.” Harrison said. “One of the reasons we are successful is I’m competitive in price and you can’t beat our quality. Most fish hatcheries have a mortality rate of 3 to 5%, while our mortality rate is less than a half percent.” The fish that are regularly stocked are: fathead minnow, golden shiner, bighead carp, grass carp, redear sunfish, bluegill, largemouth bass, koi, hybrid striped bass, black crappie, walleye, yellow perch, northern pike, muskie, channel catfish, smallmouth bass, straight bluegill, catfish, white amur and hybrid bluegill. “Our easiest fish to raise is koi, bluegill and crappie but the hardest to raise is definitely the walleye,” Harrison said. To schedule a tour of Harrison Fishery located in Hurdland, Missouri, call: 660-423-5482. To learn more about Harrison Fishery go to: www.harrisonfishery.com.

The largest fish hatchery in the state of Missouri and one of the largest in the Midwest sits in a valley in the northeast region of the state.

Harrison Fishery has over 120 acres of water and 75 production ponds plus a new state of the art 100,000 gallon indoor re-circulating system.

The indoor system is where straight and hybrid bluegill, largemouth bass and smallmouth bass are kept until they have food training before being released into the ponds.

Curtis Harrison is the owner of the fishery. Harrison graduated from the University of Missouri with an engineering degree. After graduation he returned home and bought a “hobby farm”.

“I soon realized that this farm was no hobby, I worked from sun up to sun down and made barely enough money to support myself,” Harrison said.

Harrison did some investigation into the idea of a fish hatchery since the farm already had three ponds.

“I added another three ponds the first year and then four the next,” Harrison explained. “My father helped me the first three years and then retired, by that time the farm was well on its way and I really enjoy having control over my own destiny.”

Today, Harrison’s youngest son Carter is learning the business and the farm has nine fulltime workers.

“I treat everyone like family, we work hard but we also laugh hard,” Harrison said.

Harrison said his quality and cost of product simply can’t be beat on the local level.

“Our customers want a higher quality fish. One of our largest customers is the Missouri Conservation Department. We also have done work for Bass Pro Shops.” Harrison said. “One of the reasons we are successful is I’m competitive in price and you can’t beat our quality. Most fish hatcheries have a mortality rate of 3 to 5%, while our mortality rate is less than a half percent.”

The fish that are regularly stocked are: fathead minnow, golden shiner, bighead carp, grass carp, redear sunfish, bluegill, largemouth bass, koi, hybrid striped bass, black crappie, walleye, yellow perch, northern pike, muskie, channel catfish, smallmouth bass, straight bluegill, catfish, white amur and hybrid bluegill.

“Our easiest fish to raise is koi, bluegill and crappie but the hardest to raise is definitely the walleye,” Harrison said.

To schedule a tour of Harrison Fishery located in Hurdland, Missouri, call: 660-423-5482. To learn more about Harrison Fishery go to: www.harrisonfishery.com.