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MDC suggests fish habitat projects in winter

The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) suggests adding underwater structures to boost sport fish numbers in farm ponds and small lakes. Tory Mason, MDC fisheries management biologist, said completing products during winter will have them ready for spring when fish spawn and summer when anglers will be catching fish. “Structures are good if you want to attract fish to certain areas like near docks or in a place within casting distance of shore,” Mason said. “Another use is providing spawning habitat.” He said structures placed with the goal of attracting fish is different from structures used for recruitment. Structure can be a tree or group of trees, wooden shipping pallets, PVC pipe arrangements or benches made from concrete blocks and boards depending on the use. During a hard winter freeze when the ice is thick, structures can be hauled out onto the ice and allowed to drop to the bottom when the ice melts. In spring and summer, fish will usually prefer more shallow water habitats especially when spawning. Fish prefer spawning and resting sites that offer them shelter from disturbance or predators. “Fish feel more comfortable being near something,” Mason said. Fathead minnows can be an important food to help fish such as largemouth bass grow large. Shipping pallets stacked in shallow water or placed atop concrete blocks provides spawning habitat for minnows. He said trees are an inexpensive way to provide habitat but being selective about which trees is helpful. Hardwood or red cedar trees are best because they can last a long time under water before rotting away. Oak, hickory, Osage orange and locust work well. Mason said the downside is they are a place to hang up lures and bait. The upside is they attract fish for years. For more information about adding structures for fish in farm ponds, contact Mason by phone at 816-271-3111, ext. 1432.

The Missouri Department of Conservation suggests adding underwater structures to boost sport fish numbers in farm ponds and small lakes.

Tory Mason, MDC fisheries management biologist, said completing products during winter will have them ready for spring when fish spawn and summer when anglers will be catching fish.

“Structures are good if you want to attract fish to certain areas like near docks or in a place within casting distance of shore,” Mason said. “Another use is providing spawning habitat.”

He said structures placed with the goal of attracting fish is different from structures used for recruitment.

The structure can be a tree or group of trees, wooden shipping pallets, PVC pipe arrangements or benches made from concrete blocks and boards depending on the use.

During a hard winter freeze when the ice is thick, structures can be hauled out onto the ice and allowed to drop to the bottom when the ice melts.

In spring and summer, fish will usually prefer shallower water habitats, especially when spawning. Fish prefer spawning and resting sites that offer them shelter from disturbance or predators.

“Fish feel more comfortable being near something,” Mason said.

Fathead minnows can be an important food to help fish such as largemouth bass grow large.

Shipping pallets stacked in shallow water or placed atop concrete blocks provides a spawning habitat for minnows.

He said trees are an inexpensive way to provide a habitat, but being selective about which trees is helpful. Hardwood or red cedar trees are best because they can last a long time under water before rotting away. Oak, hickory, Osage orange and locust work well.

Mason said the downside is they are a place to hang up lures and bait. The upside is they attract fish for years.

For more information about adding structures for fish in farm ponds, contact Mason by phone at 816-271-3111, ext. 1432.


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Krafter's Corner sells handmade merchandise

Krafter’s Corner in Smithville, Missouri, sells handmade items by crafters and local artisans. Louise Keeton opened the business in 2006 with her sister. “This is more of a hobby and passion for me than anything because I like socializing with people,” Keeton said. “I don’t take home a paycheck. This gives me a sanctuary where I can go make items and help people.” She said they cater to customers looking for craft supplies, antiques and vintage fair items. Each booth is rented to area crafters and they sell their merchandise in the store. She said there is a monthly fee based on booth size and there is a 15 percent commission. “Each booth is a business so you’re looking at a bunch of small businesses under one roof when you shop,” Keeton said. Keeton said each booth has its own business owner and offers different products. They have handmade items for baby gifts, wedding gifts and birthday gifts. Betty’s Handmade Gifts sells bowl koozies, tortilla warmers and coasters. Jim’s Unique Woodworking sells lazy susans that are large and small, cutting boards and wooden plates. Beautiful Day Farms based in Richmond, Missouri, is owned by a military veteran that makes candles and melts. She said one of the most popular items they sell are kitchen towels with buttons that are fit to hang from a dishwasher, cabinet door or stove. In addition, the store also offers bird houses and paper daisies. Babies by Annette is a booth of quality dolls that are weighed and dressed. A vendor will offer a class to make designs out of stained glass on Sunday afternoons or Monday mornings. It is required for a face mask to be worn. The cost for the class is $25. Krafter’s Corner is located at 101 E. Main Street in historic downtown Smithville. They are open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday through Friday and from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturday. They can be contacted by phone at 816-873-0058.

Krafter’s Corner in Smithville, Missouri, sells handmade items by crafters and local artisans.

Louise Keeton opened the business in 2006 with her sister.

“This is more of a hobby and passion for me than anything because I like socializing with people,” Keeton said. “I don’t take home a paycheck. This gives me a sanctuary where I can go make items and help people.”

She said they cater to customers looking for craft supplies, antiques and vintage fair items.

Each booth is rented to area crafters and they sell their merchandise in the store.

She said there is a monthly fee based on booth size and there is a 15 percent commission.

“Each booth is a business so you’re looking at a bunch of small businesses under one roof when you shop,” Keeton said.

Keeton said each booth has its own business owner and offers different products.

They have handmade items for baby gifts, wedding gifts and birthday gifts.

Betty’s Handmade Gifts sells bowl koozies, tortilla warmers and coasters.

Jim’s Unique Woodworking sells lazy susans that are large and small, cutting boards and wooden plates.

Beautiful Day Farms, based in Richmond, Missouri, is owned by a military veteran that makes candles and melts.

Babies by Annette is a booth of quality dolls that are weighed and dressed.

She said one of the most popular items they sell are kitchen towels with buttons that are fit to hang from a dishwasher, cabinet door or stove.

In addition, the store also offers bird houses and paper daisies.

A vendor will offer a class to make designs out of stained glass on Sunday afternoons or Monday mornings. It is required for a face mask to be worn. The cost for the class is $25.

Krafter’s Corner is located at 101 E. Main Street in historic downtown Smithville.

They are open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday through Friday and from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturday. They can be contacted by phone at 816-873-0058.


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